Consultation by Gatwick Airport

Relevant parts of the consultation document

Areas of interest

This location falls within the airspace used by flights to/from Gatwick Airport where we are proposing changes below 4,000ft. Select the next tab to learn more about today’s air traffic patterns.

Today's flights

The map below shows where today’s air traffic flies. The wind direction on any given day dictates which direction the runway is used for take-off and landing. Click the options above for maps relating to each wind direction. You can also highlight the boundaries of National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB).  Select the next tab to see our consultation swathes.

This figure illustrates today’s Gatwick airport flight paths from a normal week; the coloured shading indicates the average number of flights.

The plot shows all flights; we have not limited the altitude of the plots because an observer on the ground will notice aircraft in and around the areas of interest regardless of altitude, and because we want to give you a sense of the overall traffic pattern – where flights are going to and coming from. We have provided a series of maps in the Appendices of the consultation document for those wishing to see a more detailed view of aircraft positions at various altitudes.

The black arrows illustrate the general direction of the predominant departure flows and the blue arrows show the same for arrivals. The blue arrows showing a circuit denote the holds where aircraft circle when there is a queue for landing.

The purple-outlined areas define the extent of the swathe for the Noise Preferential Route, or NPR. NPR swathes define an area where departing aircraft below 4,000ft are required to fly; these areas take account of the accuracy with which aircraft can fly a route and the rate at which they typically climb to 4,000ft.

Today's flights

The map below shows where today’s air traffic flies. The wind direction on any given day dictates which direction the runway is used for take-off and landing. Click the options above for maps relating to each wind direction. You can also highlight the boundaries of National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Select the next tab to see our consultation swathes.

This figure illustrates today’s Gatwick airport flight paths from a normal week; the coloured shading indicates the average number of flights.

The plot shows all flights; we have not limited the altitude of the plots because an observer on the ground will notice aircraft in and around the areas of interest regardless of altitude, and because we want to give you a sense of the overall traffic pattern – where flights are going to and coming from. We have provided a series of maps in the Appendices of the consultation document for those wishing to see a more detailed view of aircraft positions at various altitudes.

The black arrows illustrate the general direction of the predominant departure flows and the blue arrows show the same for arrivals. The blue arrows showing a circuit denote the holds where aircraft circle when there is a queue for landing.

The purple-outlined areas define the extent of the swathe for the Noise Preferential Route, or NPR. NPR swathes define an area where departing aircraft below 4,000ft are required to fly; these areas take account of the accuracy with which aircraft can fly a route and the rate at which they typically climb to 4,000ft.

Today's flights

The map below shows where today’s air traffic flies. The wind direction on any given day dictates which direction the runway is used for take-off and landing. Click the options above for maps relating to each wind direction. You can also highlight the boundaries of National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Select the next tab to see our consultation swathes.

This figure illustrates today’s Gatwick airport flight paths from a normal week; the coloured shading indicates the average number of flights.

The plot shows all flights; we have not limited the altitude of the plots because an observer on the ground will notice aircraft in and around the areas of interest regardless of altitude, and because we want to give you a sense of the overall traffic pattern – where flights are going to and coming from. We have provided a series of maps in the Appendices of the consultation document for those wishing to see a more detailed view of aircraft positions at various altitudes.

The black arrows illustrate the general direction of the predominant departure flows and the blue arrows show the same for arrivals. The blue arrows showing a circuit denote the holds where aircraft circle when there is a queue for landing.

The purple-outlined areas define the extent of the swathe for the Noise Preferential Route, or NPR. NPR swathes define an area where departing aircraft below 4,000ft are required to fly; these areas take account of the accuracy with which aircraft can fly a route and the rate at which they typically climb to 4,000ft.

Today's flights

The map below shows where today’s air traffic flies. The wind direction on any given day dictates which direction the runway is used for take-off and landing. Click the options above for maps relating to each wind direction. You can also highlight the boundaries of National Parks and Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB). Select the next tab to see our consultation swathes.

This figure illustrates today’s Gatwick airport flight paths from a normal week; the coloured shading indicates the average number of flights.

The plot shows all flights; we have not limited the altitude of the plots because an observer on the ground will notice aircraft in and around the areas of interest regardless of altitude, and because we want to give you a sense of the overall traffic pattern – where flights are going to and coming from. We have provided a series of maps in the Appendices of the consultation document for those wishing to see a more detailed view of aircraft positions at various altitudes.

The black arrows illustrate the general direction of the predominant departure flows and the blue arrows show the same for arrivals. The blue arrows showing a circuit denote the holds where aircraft circle when there is a queue for landing.

The purple-outlined areas define the extent of the swathe for the Noise Preferential Route, or NPR. NPR swathes define an area where departing aircraft below 4,000ft are required to fly; these areas take account of the accuracy with which aircraft can fly a route and the rate at which they typically climb to 4,000ft.

Select a map

Consultation swathes

This map shows the easterly arrivals and departures for Gatwick Airport below 4,000ft. You can see the westerly arrivals and departures for Gatwick Airport by selecting the toggles above.

The coloured areas show the swathes within which we need to position a route. You can zoom in on specific areas by clicking on the map. More information can be found in the additional notes box. Select the next tab for information on aircraft noise, or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail.

Additional notes

The coloured shading on the map denotes the consultation swathe for positioning the Gatwick Airport Runway 08 arrival and departure routes below 4,000ft.

The final positions of the routes within these areas will be determined after consultation feedback has been analysed.  The position of the routes will determine how areas within the shaded regions are impacted; areas beneath the final routes would expect more over flights than today, and areas away from the routes would expect fewer.

Table B1 shows the potential number of flights that could pass directly overhead if the route was positioned overhead. This is a pessimistic prediction as the numbers shown are for the busiest individual route and it assumes all aircraft are kept on the route in question rather than being vectored off it by air traffic control; which in reality would occur some of the time.   

Route 2016 2020 2025
Arrival daytime (0700-2300) 20 21 23
Arrival night time (2300-0700) 4 4 5
Busiest departure route daytime (0700-2300) 7 8 8
Busiest departure route night time (2300-0700) 3 3 3

Table B1: Forecast for Gatwick route usage – numbers are hourly averages – see Appendix G for a more detailed traffic breakdown

 

Table B2 provides Lmax noise information for the typical and noisiest aircraft regularly flying to/from Gatwick.  Lmax is the maximum noise at ground level from an aircraft flying directly overhead.  The Lmax values may be compared to Table B3 for everyday equivalents. Additional overflight videos are provided on the webpage to help stakeholders understand what aircraft at various altitudes may look and sound like.

 

Aircraft type % of flights 2,000-3,000ft 3,000-4,000ft 4,000-5,000ft
Typical Arrival A320/B737 series[1] 72.2% 64-69 dBA 61-64 dBA 59-61 dBA
Noisiest Arrival  B747-400 1.5% 71-77 dBA 67-71 dBA 67-64 dBA
Typical Departure A320/B737 series 72.2% 70 – 75 dBA 66 -70 dBA 63-66 dBA
Noisiest Departure   B747-400 1.5% 79 – 84 dBA 75 – 79 dBA 72 – 75 dBA

Table B2: Typical Noise (Lmax) (Arrivals) at various heights[2]

 

Noise Noise level (dBA)
Chainsaw, 1m distance 110
Disco, 1m from speaker 100
Diesel truck pass-by, 10m away 90
Kerbside of busy road, 5m away 80
Vacuum cleaner, distance 1m 70
Conversational speech, 1m 60
Quiet office 50
Room in quiet, suburban area 40

Table B3: Tables of Lmax Equivalents (Based substantially on www.sengpielaudio.com/TableOfSoundPressureLevels.htm)



[1] Includes the following aircraft types: Airbus A318/319/320/321, Boeing 737-600/700/800/900 (Ancon category, 125-180 seat single-aisle 2-eng jet)

[2] This table shows Lmax at a height above ground level.  Local elevation should be taken into account.

Consultation swathes

This map shows the westerly arrivals and departures for Gatwick Airport below 4,000ft. You can see the easterly arrivals and departures for Gatwick Airport by selecting the toggles above.

The coloured areas show the swathes within which we need to position a route. You can zoom in on specific areas by clicking on the map. More information can be found in the additional notes box. Select the next tab for information on aircraft noise, or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail.

Additional notes

The coloured shading on the map denotes the consultation swathe for positioning the Gatwick Airport Runway 26 arrival and departure routes below 4,000ft.

The final positions of the routes within these areas will be determined after consultation feedback has been analysed.  The position of the routes will determine how areas within the shaded regions are impacted; areas beneath the final routes would expect more over flights than today, and areas away from the routes would expect fewer.

Table B1 shows the potential number of flights that could pass directly overhead if the route was positioned overhead. This is a pessimistic prediction as the numbers shown are for the busiest individual route and it assumes all aircraft are kept on the route in question rather than being vectored off it by air traffic control; which in reality would occur some of the time. 

Route 2016 2020 2025
Arrival daytime (0700-2300) 20 21 23
Arrival night time (2300-0700) 4 4 5
Busiest departure route daytime (0700-2300) 7 8 8
Busiest departure route night time (2300-0700) 3 3 3

Table B1: Forecast for Gatwick route usage – numbers are hourly averages – see Appendix G for a more detailed traffic breakdown
Table B2 provides Lmax noise information for the typical and noisiest aircraft regularly flying to/from Gatwick.  Lmax is the maximum noise at ground level from an aircraft flying directly overhead.  The Lmax values may be compared to Table B3 for everyday equivalents. Additional overflight videos are provided on the webpage to help stakeholders understand what aircraft at various altitudes may look and sound like.

Aircraft type % of flights 2,000-3,000ft 3,000-4,000ft 4,000-5,000ft
Typical Arrival
A320/B737 series[1]
72.2% 64-69 dBA 61-64 dBA 59-61 dBA
Noisiest Arrival
B747-400
1.5% 71-77 dBA 67-71 dBA 67-64 dBA
Typical Departure
A320/B737 series
72.2% 70 – 75 dBA 66 -70 dBA 63-66 dBA
Noisiest Departure
B747-400
1.5% 79 – 84 dBA 75 – 79 dBA 72 – 75 dBA

Table B2: Typical Noise (Lmax) (Arrivals) at various heights[2]

 

Noise Noise level (dBA)
Chainsaw, 1m distance 110
Disco, 1m from speaker 100
Diesel truck pass-by, 10m away 90
Kerbside of busy road, 5m away 80
Vacuum cleaner, distance 1m 70
Conversational speech, 1m 60
Quiet office 50
Room in quiet, suburban area 40

Table B3: Tables of Lmax Equivalents (Based substantially on www.sengpielaudio.com/TableOfSoundPressureLevels.htm)

 


[1] Includes the following aircraft types: Airbus A318/319/320/321, Boeing 737-600/700/800/900 (Ancon category, 125-180 seat single-aisle 2-eng jet)

[2] This table shows Lmax at a height above ground level.  Local elevation should be taken into account.

 

Noise

We have provided videos that aim to illustrate aircraft flying overhead at various altitudes; these include a range of aircraft types. For detailed noise tables see Appendix J of the consultation document or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail on the proposal.

Noise

We have provided videos that aim to illustrate aircraft flying overhead at various altitudes; these include a range of aircraft types. For detailed noise tables see Appendix J of the consultation document or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail on the proposal.

Noise

We have provided videos that aim to illustrate aircraft flying overhead at various altitudes; these include a range of aircraft types. For detailed noise tables see Appendix J of the consultation document or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail on the proposal.

Noise

We have provided videos that aim to illustrate aircraft flying overhead at various altitudes; these include a range of aircraft types. For detailed noise tables see Appendix J of the consultation document or click the links to the consultation document above for more detail on the proposal.